October 21, 2014

Problems Persist With Chicken Jerky Dog Treats From China

Chicken Jerky dog treats imported from China continue to pose serious health problems for American dogs. But despite five years of research and testing, it’s not clear why, according to the latest product safety update from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

In the July 18 update, the agency stops short of telling consumers not to feed the treats to their pets, but urges people who choose to do so to watch their pets for tellltale signs of serious illness: decreased appetite and activity, vomiting, diarrhea, and an increase in water consumption and urination. The dried chicken products are sold as “jerky,” “tenders,” “strips” or “treats.”

The FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) has ben receiving complaints of canine illness associated with chicken jerky treats manufactured in China since 2007. The number of complaints dropped off in 2010 but picked up again last year.  In November 2011, the agency issued a cautionary update saying basically what it said today: a number of dogs have become seriously ill after consuming chicken jerky treats from China, but tests haven’t yet shown why.

Jerky samples have been tested by the FDA, the Veterinary Laboratory Response Network and by other animal health diagnostic laboratories in the U.S . They have looked for chemical and microbiological contaminants including: Salmonella, pesticides, antibiotics and metals as well as furans, mycotoxins, rodenticides, nephrotoxins and other chemicals and poisonous compounds. Samples have been submitted for DNA verification to confirm the presence of poultry and analyzed for nutritional composition, vitamin D excess and enterotoxin analysis.

Yet none of these tests has been conclusive. “Samples collected from all over the United States have been tested for a wide variety of substances and to date, scientists have not been able to determine a definitive cause for the reported illnesses,” the update states. The FDA continues to test and  is now asking private diagnostic labs to  submit quotes on conducting analysis of the nutritional composition of the dried chicken samples.

At this point, no recalls have been issued. The agency advises pet owners who do choose to feed their dogs these treats, to get medical attention for any dog who develops symptoms that last for more than 24 hours.

Comments

  1. i read an article about the poisonous effect of the chinese dog treat. I think it is made of chemical to save some bugs you should not buy cheap Chinese stuff.

  2. Sue Nichols says:

    In the meantime, they admit that they can make animals sick, and even kill them, but since they can not figure out why, they choose to leave these things on the market, for new dog owners, to discover, and harm or kill more pets. I think this is so wrong, and I think they should just pull all this crap from every shelf, in every state and in every country…
    Everytime I go to like Walmart, or any stores that carry these things, I have some pre made signs I keep in my car, along with scotch tape, and I quiety go to the pet department, and hang up my sign by the treats…hoping that just one person, will realize what harm can be caused by giving this to their animals. ♥ Other than posting to FB, and around, its the next best thing I can do.

    • Good for you, Sue!!
      Even if you stop one customer from buying those products, it’s worth it!!!

  3. I was told MONTHS ago, not long after my otherwise healthy 2 year old dog died 4 days after he ate ONE piece of Waggin Train from a new bag, that the FDA was looking at the gylcerin, and jatropha based product was the name the person used. I did research. I have little doubt that it killed my dog. Massive organ failure. My female ate from the same bag, got midly sick but recovered. My 2 other dogs did not eat from that bag!!! NO illness at all!!! Obviously some bags are tainted, some not. AND if you look at the color variations in the bags, some probably have more of the glycerin coating, making them lethal!! NO one would listen to me then!!! Some made fun of me, saying my “investigations nonsense” was upsetting people. One web site that talks about dog food listened, did some reseach and posted on his page right after I sent him the FDA advisory. WT does say ALL NATURAL and jatropha is that. Just very toxic if not properly purified.

  4. I just read the warning from the FDA concerning glycerin from bio-diesel derived from the Jatropha curas plant- not to use this glycerin in pharmaceuticals or food products. Currently, according the FDA website, they have no method to test for these Jatropha-toxins, phorbol esters. Do the chicken jerky manufacturers know for certain the origin of their glycerin?

    • Linda Larsen says:

      I don’t know if the chicken jerky manufacturers know the origin of any of their products. Because of labeling laws in this country, any chicken imported from China can be altered and manufacturers don’t have to include the country of origin on the label. What’s “altered”? Cooking and mixing.

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