December 7, 2021

Raw Oysters Recalled in Canada For Possible Norovirus Contamination

Several brands of raw oysters have been recalled in Canada for possible norovirus contamination. Norovirus causes gastrointestinal illness that is often called the stomach flu.

Raw Oysters Recalled in Canada For Possible Norovirus Contamination

The first recall, of Union Bay Seafood raw oysters, was triggered by an investigation into a foodborne illness outbreak. Illnesses have been reported in association with the consumption of these oysters.

Union Bay Seafood is recalling Pacific Oysters for possible norovirus. The recalled products include Pacific Oysters, Chef Creek Xsm, sold in 5 dozen lots. There is no UPC number on the product. The codes on the recalled oysters are: Harvest location: BC 14-8 Landfile: 1402060 Lot: W20200211 Harvest date: 10 Feb. 2020. Also recalled are Pacific Oysters, Cascade Xsm in 5 dozen lots. The codes on that product are Harvest location: BC 14-8 Landfile: 1402060 Lot: W20200211 Harvest date: 10 Feb. 2020. Finally, Pacific Oysters, Royal Miyagi Xsm are recalled, also sold in 5 dozen lots. The codes on that product are Harvest location: BC 14-8 Landfile: 1402060 Lot: W20200211 Harvest date: 10 Feb. 2020.

La Mer is recalling some Les Huîtres Cadoret – La Perle Noire brand oysters as well. Those recalled products include Huitres speciales #4 Cadoret Perles Noires 24 CT – France in 24 count containers. The UPC number on the product is 0 209656 067997, and the codes are Emballele 13.FE.20. Also recalled is Huitres speciales #4 Cadoret Perles Noires 12 CT – France sold in 12 count packages. The UPC number on that product is 0 209656 034996 with the code Emballele 13.FE.20. The recall of these products was triggered by a consumer complaint.

If you purchased these raw oysters, do not eat them. Throw them away in a sealed container, or take them back to the place of purchase for a refund.

Symptoms of norovirus include diarrhea, vomiting, nausea, stomach cramps, fever, headache, chills, muscle aches, and fatigue. Symptoms can start as soon as 12 hours after exposure. Most people do get better within a day or two, although some patients may become dehydrated and need hospitalization.

 

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