June 16, 2021

Supplement Company Owner Pleads Guilty to Selling Steroid-Like Drugs

A New Jersey supplement company owner pleads guilty to introducing an unapproved new drug into interstate commerce "with the intent to defraud and mislead the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and consumers," according to a news release from the U.S. Department of Justice.  The owner is Nicholas Andrew Puccio. The government alleges that from 2016 to 2020, Puccio marketed drugs as dietary supplements to the bodybuilding and fitness community. The supplements allegedly included a product labeled as containing ostarine, a type of synthetic steroid known as a Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator (SARM). Dietary supplements cannot contain unapproved drugs or they are considered unapproved new drugs by the FDA. The FDA has long warned against the use of SARMs, stating that they … [Read more...]

How Should You Handle and Cook Frozen Raw Breaded Chicken Breasts?

A new Salmonella outbreak that has sickened at least 17 people is linked to frozen raw breaded stuffed chicken breasts. Sixty-two percent of these patients have been hospitalized because they are so sick. And unfortunately, this is not the first time a serious outbreak has been linked to these types of products. How should you handle and cook frozen raw breaded stuffed chicken? In Canada in 2018 and 2019, almost 600 people were sickened by a Salmonella outbreak linked to frozen raw breaded chicken. Also in 2018, an outbreak in the U.S. was linked to Ruby's Pantry frozen breaded raw chicken. In 2015, two outbreaks linked to these products that were made by Aspen Foods and Barber Foods sickened at least 20 people in the United States. And remember that in Salmonella outbreaks, case … [Read more...]

Memorial Day Grilling Food Safety Tips From the USDA

Memorial Day is next Monday, so the USDA is offering Memorial Day grilling food safety tips, to pros and beginners alike for the long weekend. Rates of food poisoning and food poisoning outbreaks increase in the summer months because bacteria grow faster in warm weather. In addition, cooking and eating food outdoors can be risky because people are tempted to take shortcuts to food safety. Sandra Eskin, USDA's Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety said in a statement, "Memorial Day marks the beginning of warmer weather and summer fun. Don’t let foodborne illness ruin the cookout –follow food safety guidelines like washing your hands, thoroughly cooking your food and checking food temperature with a thermometer." First, always use a food thermometer when you are cooking meat and … [Read more...]

High Levels of Arsenic and Lead in Vinegars, Says Food and Water Watch

There are high levels of arsenic and lead in vinegars, according to a letter that Food & Water Watch sent to officials at the FDA. The letter was also signed by the Empire State Consumer Project (ESCP). The letter claims that dangerously high lead and arsenic levels have been found in many brands of vinegars, especially balsamic vinegar, and vinegar reductions that are sold in United States grocery stores. Those organizations are asking the FDA to protect the public, especially children and pregnant women, who are most at risk for serious health problems from those heavy metals. They want the FDA to establish limits for those compounds in vinegars and to add warning labels on products. ESCP's test results showed that of the 24 samples of major brands of vinegars or vinegar … [Read more...]

How Do You Know If You Have Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome?

Hemolytic uremic syndrome can be a complication of a Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infection that is a type of kidney failure. People who develop this condition often need dialysis and may even need kidney transplants. They can also suffer seizures. This condition can be life-threatening. Other causes of this condition include taking certain medications, having other types of infections, and inheriting a type of HUS that runs in families. In the group which has developed HUS after an E. coli infection, most are under the age of five. Among children younger than 18 who develop hemolytic uremic syndrome, about 80% have had STEC infections. About 5 to 10% of patients who contract STEC infections develop HUS. All patients with HUS should be hospitalized so their condition and … [Read more...]

FDA Starts Sampling Salinas Valley Lettuce For E. coli Contamination

The FDA has started sampling Salinas Valley lettuce for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli and Salmonella species as part of online surveillance efforts following recurrent outbreaks linked to the products grown in this region. E. coli O157:H7 outbreaks linked to these products, more specifically romaine lettuce, have occurred in 2020, 2019, and 2018. Romaine lettuce is uniquely susceptible to contamination because of the way it grows. The lettuce grows in a cup shape very close to the ground. That shape can collect and hold irrigation water, which can be contaminated with pathogens, especially if the farm field is located near factory cattle farms. There is a recurring strain of E. coli O157:H7 in the region that has been identified in leafy greens year after year. In this new … [Read more...]

How to Clean Fresh Fruits and Vegetables To Protect Yourself

As we head into the summer months in the Northern hemisphere, people start eating more fresh fruits and vegetables. And unfortunately, every year there are outbreaks linked to those products, from cyclospora to E. coli. As a matter of fact, fresh produce is one of the main ways people get sick from food poisoning, and one of the major causes of multistate food poisoning outbreaks. From Salmonella on peaches to E. coli on romaine lettuce to cyclospora on basil, these foods sicken thousands of people every year. While it's not possible to make these foods completely safe without cooking them to 165°F, you can reduce your risk by cleaning them properly before preparation. First, do not use soap or bleach or other disinfectants to clean fruits and vegetables. Because these items are … [Read more...]

FDA Releases Report on Deli Food Poisoning Risk Factors

The FDA has released a new report on deli food poisoning risk factors. This study is part of a 10-year initiative that looks at risk factors in retail settings, which include employee practices, personal hygiene, and food safety practices such as improper handwashing. Some deli foods, such as soft cheeses and sliced meats,  are considered high risk for possible Listeria monocytogenes contamination, due to the difficulty of cleaning some equipment and the intrinsic makeup of these foods. The study highlights the importance of having a well-developed Food Safety Management Systems (FSMS) and employing Certified Food Protection Managers, since delis with these procedures and employees are more likely to properly control foodborne illness risk factors. A well-developed FSMS was the … [Read more...]

Soaking Nuts Grains and Seeds in Cold Water Reduces Salmonella Risk

Soaking nuts grains and seeds in cold water reduces the risk of Salmonella growth, according to a new study from Oregon State University. Raw sprouts have long been considered a risky food because they are often contaminated with pathogens that can cause serious illness, and there is no "kill" step before they are eaten. These foods aren't exactly "sprouts," which are a known food safety risk, since the root doesn't emerge, but include grains, nuts, and seeds that are soaked so their hulls soften and the product swells. These products are made by soaking in room temperature water overnight. When the hulls swell, "anti nutrients" are reduced, which are compounds that reduce the human's body to absorb vitamins and minerals. These foods are then dried using low temperature and humidity … [Read more...]

Checklist for Cleaning Your Pantry and Refrigerator From USDA

It's time for spring cleaning in the northern hemisphere, and one place food safety conscious consumers should focus is the kitchen. Your pantry and refrigerator can harbor pathogens and should be regularly cleaned and sanitized. The USDA is offering a checklist for cleaning your pantry and refrigerator. Your refrigerator should always be set between 34°F and 40°F. Any higher and pathogens should grow, and any lower and food could freeze and lose quality. Many newer refrigerators do have built-in thermostats so you can check the temp, but if your doesn't, an inexpensive thermometer is available most everywhere. To keep your fridge clean, follow these steps. Always clean spills immediately with warm, soapy water. Don't use solvent cleaning agents or abrasives, since the fumes from … [Read more...]

Report Your Food Poisoning Case
[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]
×
×

Home About Site Map Contact Us Sponsored by Pritzker Hageman, P.A., a Minneapolis, MN law firm that helps food poisoning victims nationally.