May 28, 2024

Halloween Food Safety Tips For a Safe Holiday

It’s almost Halloween! These Halloween food safety tips from Foodsafety.gov will help you make sure that your holiday celebrations are healthy as well as fun.

Halloween Safety Tips For a Safe Holiday

Halloween food safety begins before trick-or-treating. Make sure that your kids have a good meal before they start out so they aren’t tempted to snack from their goodies before you have had a chance to check them for safety. Tell your kids to wait until they get home before they eat any candy or treats.

Tell your kids not to accept, and certainly not to eat, any homemade treats. Commercially wrapped candy and treats are the only safe choices.

At home, check the treats for any signs of tampering. They may include an unusual appearance, discoloration, pinholes, or tears in the wrappers. Throw away anything that doesn’t look right to you. If your child has a food allergy, check the labels to make sure the treat doesn’t contain the allergen. For the same reason, don’t let your child eat any home baked goods because you never know what’s in them.

If you have very young children, check their bags and remove any small candies or toys that may be choking hazards. They include peanuts, gum, hard candies, and small toys.

If you are having a Halloween party at home, there are some things to keep in mind. If you are bobbing for apples, don’t just put apples into a tub of water; that’s unsanitary.Make sure that the apples are thoroughly washed first. Don’t play this game if anyone at the party isn’t feeling well. Or find other types of Halloween party games.

If you are offering cider, never serve unpasteurized cider or juice. They can contain harmful pathogens such as E. coli and Salmonella.

Never eat raw cookie dough or cake batter if you are making those treats. Uncooked flour and raw eggs can also contain pathogens that can make you very sick.

When serving hot foods, make sure they stay hot. Use a hot plate or a slow cooker to hold food. And remember that all foods, even food that is cooked to safe final internal temperatures, can only be out at room temperature for two hours before it must be discarded.

For the same reason, keep cold foods cold. Store perishable chilled foods in the fridge until serving time. Finger sandwiches, cheese platters, dips, cut fruit or veggies, and cold pasta salads can only be out at room temperature for two hours; one hour if the air temperature is above 90°F.

Stay safe and have a wonderful Halloween!

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