October 18, 2017

10 E. coli Cases in OH and MI, Are Burgers the Source of an Outbreak?

Are rare burgers the source of an E. coli outbreak in Michigan and Ohio? Lab tests have shown that cases in both states are a genetic match and health authorities in Michigan have identified ground beef as the source as all of the Michigan cases reported eating a rare hamburger at different restaurants before becoming ill.

skylers hamburgerIt’s possible other states are involved. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is working with state and county health departments to track the the source of the ground beef which may have been contaminated with E. coli O157 before it arrived at restaurant locations in Michigan.

In Ohio, the four case patients range in age from 19 to 42. Three are from Lucas county, one is from Portage county. In Michigan, the case patients, who range in age from 20 to 41, are from six counties including Kent, Livingston, Oakland, Ottawa, Washtenaw, and Grand Traverse. Three of them were hospitalized, including one young man who battled a life-threatening infection for 10 days.

Symptoms of E. coli poisoning take about three days to develop. They include severe abdominal pain and cramping and diarrhea that is often bloody. Anyone who experiences these symptoms should see a doctor and make sure to mention a possible E. coli exposure, as treatment with antibiotics makes E. coli infections worse.

Comments

  1. Gene Cox says:

    E Coli is for some reason on the outside of a meat if there is any. If it is ground or comminuted, the E Coli will then be uniformly mixed in the meat if there is any. That is why whole intact meats need only be cooked to 145, but when ground, 155. If the inner temperature does not reach 155, you are asking for it. Don’t take the crazy risk.

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