December 8, 2016

Most Kids Exposed to Food Dyes

The Food and Drug Administration has found that 96% of children age 2 to 5 years are exposed to food dyes. Center for Science in the Public Interest petitioned the FDA in 2008 asking to ban eight of the nine certified color additives. CSPI senior scientist Lisa Y. Lefferts said in a statement, "such widespread exposure to artificially colored foods is bad news for all children, since artificially colored foods aren't healthy foods in the first place. The FDA is failing kids and parents by allowing the use of these purely cosmetic chemicals in food, which trigger behavioral problems in some children, as even FDA conceded in 2011." The full results of the exposure assessment have not been published. The assessment was based on the amount of color additives in almost 600 food products … [Read more...]

First Study of Its Kind Reveals Food Dyes in Brand Name Products

A new study conducted at Purdue University that has been published in the journal Clinical Pediatrics reports on the dye content of many processed foods. The Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) states that the findings are "disturbing since the amounts of dyes found in even single servings of numerous foods - or combinations of several dyed foods - are higher than the levels demonstrated in some clinical trials to impair some children's behavior." Artificial colors are used in many beverages, foods, snack foods, and sweets in the U.S. The FDA limits the colors allowed in our foods to nine different types. Studies have shown that these chemicals can affect children's behavior. The amount of food dyes that are certified has risen from 12 mg per person per day in 1950 to 62 mg … [Read more...]

Spring Celebration Egg Food Safety Advice

The folks at FightBac.org are offering some tips for keeping your food safe during spring celebrations. Easter and Passover feature lots of eggs, which can be contaminated with Salmonella bacteria, especially Salmonella enteritidis. Clean hands are key. Always wash your hands with soap and warm water for 20 seconds before and after food handling. Be careful about cross-contamination. Always wash utensils, food contact surfaces, cooking equipment, blenders, cutting boards, etc. in hot water and soap between uses. Since bacteria grow in moist, protein-rich foods, always refrigerate eggs and foods made with egg. Make sure your refrigerator is set at 40°F or below, and always use a refrigerator thermometer to monitor the temperature. Remember the two hour rule: after two hours, … [Read more...]

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