November 20, 2018

Kellogg’s Honey Smacks Cereal Linked to Salmonella Outbreak Still On Store Shelves; Lawyer Explains

The multistate Salmonella Mbandaka outbreak linked to recalled Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal has grown to include 100 sick in 33 states. Thirty people, or 39% of those interviewed by public health officials, have been hospitalized in this Kellogg’s Salmonella Honey Smacks outbreak because they are so sick.

Kellogg's Salmonella Honey Smacks 71218

Alarmingly, the FDA notice about this outbreak states, “The FDA has become aware that recalled Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal are still being offered for sale. All Honey Smacks cereal was recalled in June 2018. Retailers cannot legally offer the cereal for sale and consumers should not purchase Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal.”

Attorney Fred Pritzker

Attorney Fred Pritzker, who has represented clients in lawsuits who have been sickened with Salmonella infections, said, “We don’t know how this cereal was contaminated, but epidemiological evidence indicates it is linked to this outbreak.” Call 1-888-377-8900 ofr 612-338-0202.

Food safety lawyer Fred Pritzker stresses this point. “It is not legal for retailers or anyone, for that matter, to sell food that has been recalled. This outbreak will continue to grow until all of this product is no longer available to the public.”

The FDA and CDC both say that no one should eat any Honey Smacks sweetened puffed wheat cereal in any size package, with any “best by” date. Government officials are going to monitor this situation and will follow up with retailers if any of the cereal is on store shelves. The public is urged to report any product for sale to the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator in their region.

The CDC says that 27 more ill people from 19 states have been added to the Salmonella Honey Smacks outbreak total since the last update in mid June, 2018. Two more states have reported patients: Florida and Colorado.

Consumers should know that if they transferred the cereal to another container, they should throw that away and clean the container. If you don’t remember if the puffed wheat cereal that you bought is Kellogg’s brand or not, throw it away.

The case count by state is: Alabama (2), Arizona (3), California (6), Colorado (1), Connecticut (4), Florida (2), Georgia (2), Illinois (1), Indiana (3), Kentucky (2), Louisiana (2), Massachusetts (7), Maryland (2), Michigan (4), Mississippi (1), Montana (2), North Carolina (4), New Hampshire (1), New Jersey (4), New York (11), Ohio (1), Oklahoma (2), Oregon (2), Pennsylvania (8), Rhode Island (2), South Carolina (2), Tennessee (2), Texas (3), Utah (1), Virginia (5), Washington (3), Wisconsin (1), and West Virginia (4). Illness onset dates range from 3/3/18 to 7/2/18.

The symptoms of Salmonella food poisoning include a fever, nausea, vomiting, stomach and abdominal cramps, and diarrhea that may be bloody. If you have eaten this cereal and have been sick, see your doctor.

Bad Bug Law Team | Pritzker Law Firm

If you or a loved one have been sickened with a Salmonella infection after eating Kellogg’s Salmonella Honey Smacks, please contact our experienced attorneys for help at 1-888-377-8900 or 612-338-0202.

 

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