October 3, 2022

Search Results for: oysters vibrio

Washington Vibrio Outbreak Linked to Oysters From Samish Bay

A Washington Vibrio parahaemolyticus outbreak has sickened multiple people, according to the Washington State Department of Health. The outbreak is linked to oysters harvested in Samish Bay. The notice posted in the Shellfish Safety Map alert page says that there are multiple confirmed Vibrio illnesses. That bay is now closed to oyster harvesting. The closure period is for 21 days, but the closure may be extended if environmental test results of thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) levels are in excess of 10 MPN/gram. The closure notice was posted on July 16, 2021. No one can harvest oysters in that Bay for the next 21 days, or when officials lift the closure. The number of cases "has already surpassed the highest number of cases ever recorded by … [Read more...]

Shigella, Vibrio, E. coli Outbreak Linked to Raw Oysters Ends With 16 Sick

The Shigella, Vibrio, and E. coli outbreak that is linked to raw oysters harvested from Estero El Cardon estuary in Baja California Sur, Mexico, has ended after sickening 16 people, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  Two people were hospitalized because they were so sick. The case count by state is: Alaska (1), California (12), Illinois (1), New Hampshire (1), and Nevada (1). Illness onset dates ranged from December 16, 2018 through April 17, 2019. The patient age range was from 26 to 80 years. State public health officials found more illnesses among people who also ate raw oysters from the same harvest area. The FDA investigated a subset of the illnesses investigated by the CDC. Those five patients were sickened with Shigella … [Read more...]

Oysters From Mexico Linked to Multistate Shigella Vibrio Outbreak

Oysters from Mexico are linked to a multistate Shigella, Vibrio, E. coli, Campylobacter, and norovirus outbreak, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Some patients were sickened with more than one pathogen. This outbreak was reported by the California Department of Public Health on May 7, 2019; all of the patients at that time lived in California. Now 16 people from five states are ill in this outbreak. Two people have been hospitalized because they are so sick. No deaths have been reported. One recall, by DiCarlo Seafood in Wilmington, California, has been issued. The case count by state is: Alaska (1), California (12), Illinois (1), New Hampshire (1), and Nevada (1). Illness onset dates range from December 16, 2018 to April 4, 2019. The patient age … [Read more...]

Vibrio Shigella E. coli Outbreak Linked to Raw Oysters in California

A Vibrio Shigella E. coli and norovirus outbreak linked to raw oysters from Baja California Sur, Mexico has sickened at least 12 people in California, according to the California Department of Public Health (CDPH). Those twelve patients reported illnesses in February, March, and April 2019 after consuming raw oysters that were sold by restaurants and retailers in Los Angeles, Orange, Santa Barbara, and San Diego counties. The raw oysters were sold throughout the state. Lab testing was performed on isolates from eight cases. Officials identified Vibrio parahaemolyticus in three patients, Vibrio albensis in one, an unidentified species of Vibrio in one patient, Shigella flexneri serotype 1 in two patients, and norovirus. In addition, one of the people infected with Vibrio … [Read more...]

Learn About Raw Oysters and Vibriosis

Raw oysters are usually consumed in the summer months. But that particular type of seafood is linked to a disease called vibriosis that can make you very sick. Vibrio bacteria grow naturally in salt water. The three main strains of disease-causing vibrio bacteria are Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio alginolyticus. About 80,000 people are sickened by vibrio bacteria every year, and 100 people die. Most of these infections occur during the summer months when the water is warmer. But global warming is increasing the growth of this pathogen and others, as the ocean waters warm. That is one reason why we are seeing vibrio outbreaks in Canadian oysters. It's important to know that, as with other pathogenic bacteria, vibrio does not change the taste, texture, smell, … [Read more...]

Climate Change Increasing the Contamination of Vibrio Bacteria in Oysters

Climate change is increasing the number of pathogens in oysters, according to a study published in the National Academy of Sciences. The bacteria Vibrio parahaemolyticus and vulnificus occur naturally in the ocean. Their numbers increase when the water temperatures increase. And oysters, since they are filter feeders, take up these bacteria. When the oysters are eaten raw, people get sick. There have been been many harvesting warnings and recalls of oysters for these pathogenic bacteria in the past few years. And in 2013, there was a Vibrio outbreak associated with raw oysters that sickened at least 104 people in 13 states. Most of these illnesses occur during May to October in the United States, when people eat raw oysters. The bacteria reproduce quickly when the water is … [Read more...]

Oysters and Vibriosis

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is issuing information about the risk of contracting a Vibrio infection when consuming raw oysters. Summer is prime oyster season. And it's the time of year when most illnesses from raw oysters occur. In fact, a man in Washington state recently contracted a Vibrio infection when he purchased a live fish from a fish tank. One of the most common illnesses linked to raw oysters is vibriosis. This infection is caused by the Vibrio vulnificus or the Vibrio parahaemolyticus bacteria that occur naturally in seawater. Oysters are filter eaters, which means they draw in seawater and filter out the food and bacteria. The bacteria then become concentrated in the oysters flesh. Most Vibrio infections are caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus. … [Read more...]

In Canada, Oysters Recalled for Vibrio

Industry is recalling oysters harvested from British Columbia coastal waters on or before August 18, 2015 and intended for use as raw consumption for possible Vibrio parahaemolyticus contamination. Consumers should not eat these oysters raw and retailers and food service establishments should not sell or use them. There is no UPC number on these products, and the oysters are sold in various sizes. If consumers are unsure if they have affected oysters, check with their place of purchase. Vibrio is a naturally occurring bacteria that is present at high levels in some coastal waters when the water is warm. Most people contract a Vibrio infection by eating raw or undercooked shellfish, especially oysters. There is a Vibrio outbreak associated with the consumption of these products. … [Read more...]

Wegmans Recalls Oysters for Possible Vibrio Contamination

Wegmans has posted a recall for Kumamoto Oysters because they may be contaminated with Vibrio parahaemolyticus. This naturally-occurring bacteria can cause foodborne illness if the oysters are eaten raw. There is no word on whether or not any illnesses have been reported. The recall is for Albion Fisheries Ltd. harvested Kumamoto Oysters, sold individually at certain stores. Only those oysters with UPC number 21657100000, sold from July 17, 2014 through July 31, 2014 are recalled. The oysters were sold only at the Wegmans stores in Bridgewater, Manalapan, and Mt. Laurel in New Jersey; Pittsford in New York, and Montgomeryville and King of Prussia in Pennsylvania. If you purchased this product, do not eat it. Discard in a double bagged container or return to the place of purchase for … [Read more...]

Vibrio: Remember Vulnerable Guests When Serving Oysters

Oysters are on a lot of holiday menus. But if your're thinking of serving them raw, be aware that oysters contaminated with Vibrio vulnificus can cause life-threatening illness or fatality for people with certain medical conditions, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Those who should never consume raw oysters include pregnant women and people with cancer, diabetes, stomach disorders, compromised immune systems, liver disease from hepatitis, cirrhosis, alcoholism and iron overload disease.  Those who consume two to three drinks daily should also avoid consumption of raw oysters. What's the danger? Vibrio vulnificus infections for high-risk individuals have a 50 percent fatality rate, often within 48 hours. Symptoms of an infection usually develop within 24 to 48 … [Read more...]

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