May 25, 2018

USDA Offers Tips for Spring Gatherings

As spring celebrations approach, the USDA is offering food safety tips for these gatherings of family and friends. Foodborne illness causes 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths every year. These tips will help keep you and your family safe. Always clean your hands with warm soapy water before and after handling food. Thoroughly wash cutting boards, countertops, and utensils with hot soapy water. Always use separate cutting boards for ready-to-eat foods and for raw foods that are cooked before serving. That's how you prevent cross-contamination. Use a food thermometer when you cook. The USDA has a Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart that will guide you. Follow the temperatures and instructions to the letter. Beef, pork, veal, and lamb intact cuts such as steaks, chops, … [Read more...]

Easter Food Safety Tips

Foodsafety.gov is offering tips to keep your Easter ham and eggs safe. Ham and eggs are traditional Easter foods in the United States. When you are cooking ham, make sure you know whether or not the product is fully cooked. Hams that are fully cooked are labeled so. Ham that is not ready to eat but looks like it's ready to eat will have a statement on the label that it needs cooking before you can consume it. Fresh, raw, ham, or ham that needs to be cooked first, must reach an internal temperature of 145°F, with a three minute rest time, before it is safe to eat. Make sure that you use a reliable and accurate food thermometer to test the meat. And ham and other meats should be cooked at an oven temperature no lower than 325°F. Cooked ham and cooked vacuum-packaged ham can be … [Read more...]

USDA Guide to Hosting a Safe Super Bowl Party

The Super Bowl is this Sunday; if you're hosting a party, take advice from the USDA to make sure the food you are serving is safe. These tips and rules will help ensure that your guests are happy and don't get sick. Begin by washing your hands with warm, soapy water for at least 20 seconds. This will remove any bacteria from your hands before you start preparing the food. And make sure that dishware and utensils are clean and sanitized before you use them to prepare, warm, cook or serve food. Make sure that you separate raw foods such as raw meat and poultry and foods that are eaten uncooked such as crudités and dips. Use clean and different utensils for each dish. Never use your own spoon or fork to serve yourself foods from the buffet, or you could contaminate the food. Use … [Read more...]

For a Safe New Year’s Buffet, Follow FDA Suggestions

Plan a safe New Year's buffet with suggestions from the FDA. Many people have open houses for this holiday and offer food buffet style. The first tip is to keep serving portions small. Instead of putting out all the food at once, divide the food among some small platters and dishes ahead of time. As the food is eaten, replace those serving dishes with clean ones with fresh food. Store cold back up dishes in the refrigerator, and keep hot dishes in a crockpot, or in the oven set at 200 to 250°F. Later arriving guests can safely enjoy the same food as early arrivers. Make sure that you take the temperature of the food as it sits out. Hot foods should be at least 140°F. Some warmers only hold food at 110°F to 120°F, so make sure that your warmer will keep foods at the correct … [Read more...]

CDC Offers Food Safety Tips for the Holidays

The holidays are upon us. Many people are cooking more at home, and with that in mind, the CDC is offering food safety tips for the holidays to make sure you don't end up in the emergency room with food poisoning. First, wash your hands before you prepare food and after you touch raw meat, raw eggs, or unwashed vegetables. That last one is new - but good to know, since raw vegetables have been linked to many foodborne illness outbreaks over the years. Follow good food safety practices and cook food thoroughly. Always use a food thermometer to check the final internal temperature of meats, poultry, egg dishes, and seafood. And remember that roasts, chops, steaks, and fresh ham should stand for 3 minutes after they are removed from the oven or grill. The "danger zone" is … [Read more...]

Don’t Make Canned Breads and Cakes; They Can Harbor Botulism Toxin

Scientists at Penn State are reminding consumers that recipes for canned breads and cakes are not safe and should not be made at home. Recipes for these items are often appear around holiday time every year. These products are low acid foods with a pH above 4.6, are not shelf-stable, and can't be safely stored at room temperature. In other words, they can harbor botulism toxin. These products are made by baking batters in glass canning jars. The jars are removed from the oven and sealed and cooled so a vacuum is created. That's where the trouble starts; in a vacuum. Clostridium botulism spores grow in unrefrigerated high moisture foods that are low in acid and exposed to little or no oxygen. Clostridium botulinum bacteria are found everywhere. This bacteria grows under anaerobic … [Read more...]

Prevent Food Poisoning This Holiday Season

Center for Science in the Public Interest is helping consumers stay safe and avoid food poisoning this holiday season. Cooking food to safe internal temperatures, avoiding cross-contamination, and handling leftovers properly are all key. For instance, don't eat raw cookie dough. In 2016, an E. coli outbreak that sickened 63 people was linked to General Mills flour. Seventeen people were hospitalized because they were so sick. In that outbreak, three children were sickened when a restaurant gave them raw dough to play with. Never eat raw dough or batter, and be very careful when handling raw flour. In fact, check your pantry now to see if you may have some of the recalled products. Another problematic ingredient is raw cider. Unpasteurized cider is about as risky as raw milk. In … [Read more...]

If a Housefly or Blowfly Lands on Your Food, Don’t Eat It!

A new study published in Nature has shown that houseflies and blowflies carry many more types of pathogenic bacteria than previously thought. That means if a housefly lands on your food at a picnic, don't just brush it off. Throw the food away. These bacteria are not only unsafe from a food poisoning perspective, but one found on the flies, Helicobacter pylori, can cause peptic ulcers, increasing the risk of stomach cancer and a type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. One of the study's authors, Dr. Donald Bryant from Pennsylvania State University said, "We believe that the study may show a mechanism for pathogen transmission that has been overlooked by public health officials, and flies may contribute to the rapid transmission of pathogens in outbreak situations." These insects breed in … [Read more...]

Thanksgiving Leftovers: How to Handle Them so You Don’t Get Sick

The USDA is offering tips on how to handle Thanksgiving leftovers so you and your family don't get sick. It is now four days after Thanksgiving, which means that today is the day all of the leftover food from that holiday should be either eaten or frozen for food safety reasons.   First, remember to keep food out of the danger zone of 40°F to 140°F. That's the temperature range where bacteria grow most rapidly. All of your Thanksgiving food should have been refrigerated within two hours of finishing cooking or being taken out of the fridge. All of the food should be cooled quickly. Never put the whole turkey back into the fridge, since it can take a long to cool to a safe temperature. Cut the turkey into pieces, slice the breast, and place the meat into shallow … [Read more...]

How to Cook Thanksgiving Turkey the Safe Way

Foodsafety.gov is offering tips on how to cook Thanksgiving turkey. This bird is the centerpiece of most holiday dinners in America today. Cooking it thoroughly to a safe final internal temperature is crucial to keep you and your family safe. Turkeys, like chickens, can have Salmonella and Campylobacter bacteria on their skin. They must be carefully handled and completely cooked to prevent foodborne illness. First, never rinse the turkey. That step aerosolizes bacteria on the bird and spreads it around your kitchen. Just pat the turkey dry. The easiest way is to put a completely thawed unstuffed turkey into a roasting pan, set the oven to 325°F, and let it cook. Test it with a food thermometer after 3 hours, which is how long an 8 to 12 pound bird should cook. The larger the … [Read more...]

Report Your Food Poisoning Case
[contact-form-7 404 "Not Found"]
×
×

Home About Site Map Contact Us Sponsored by Pritzker Hageman, P.A., a Minneapolis, MN law firm that helps food poisoning victims nationally.