November 23, 2017

Nine Marines Have E. coli HUS Infections

The number of Marines sickened in the E. coli HUS outbreak at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego and Edson Range at Camp Pendleton, California keeps changing. As of November 3, 2017, an update on the MCRD San Diego Facebook page states that about 69 recruits are "symptomatic of E. coli exposure with diarrheal illness." Seventeen recruits are hospitalized off-base and the rest are receiving care on the base. Of the recruits hospitalized off-base, nine have developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). This serious complication of an E. coli infection usually strikes young children under the age of five, but can affect people of any age. HUS is a type of kidney failure and can cause strokes, seizures, and death. Brig. Gen. William Jurney, commanding general of MCRD and the … [Read more...]

Marine E. coli Outbreak Updated; More Hospitalized

The Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego has updated their investigation into the Marine E. coli outbreak there and at Camp Pendleton. As of November 2, 2017, about 86 recruits have symptoms of an E. coli infection. Of those people, sixteen are hospitalized off-base. The remaining 70 are being cared for aboard the base. There are nineteen new cases in this particular outbreak, according to the marine Corps Recruit Depot Facebook page. The Marines sickened are at MCRD San Diego and the command's field training facilities at Edson Range at Camp Pendleton, California. The initial announcement of the outbreak on November 1, 2017 stated that 302 Marines were sick with the symptoms of this type of infection. Of those, 86 are undergoing treatment. Brig. Gen. William Jurney, commanding … [Read more...]

E. coli and Cryptosporidium Cases Rise in Michigan

Cases of E. coli and Cryptosporidium increased this summer in two counties in Michigan, according to the Health Department. Jennifer Morse, medical director of three regional health departments in that state said in a statement, "These increases are concerning because the resulting illness can be life-threatening.¬†With the investigations that have been completed thus far, the major source seems to be coming from farm animals." These illnesses occurred in Mecosta and Newaygo counties in Michigan. This is important information, since we are approaching the time when many farms open their gates to tourism. Apple picking season is here. Deadly food poisoning outbreaks linked to farms have increased in the past few years. In fact, in 2013, an E. coli O157:H7 outbreak at Dehn's Pumpkins in … [Read more...]

Mysterious E. coli Outbreak in LaCrosse, WI Hospitalizes 6 Kids

An E. coli outbreak has sickened at least eight people in La Crosse, Wisconsin, and hospitalized six children. The La Crosse County Health Department is investigating the outbreak, according to the La Crosse Tribune. Some of the children have recovered and have been released from the hospital. The bacteria that made them sick is E. coli O157. And they were hospitalized because they developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a complication of an E. coli infection that can cause kidney failure, strokes, seizures, and death. This type of bacteria releases shiga toxins, which travel through the bloodstream and kill red blood cells. Those dead and damaged cells can then clog the kidneys, causing them to fail. The Wisconsin Department of Health is assisting La Crosse County in … [Read more...]

Shiga Toxin-Producing E. coli and Food Safety

The CDC has information about Shiga toxin-producing E. coli and food safety you should know. Earlier this year there was a multistate E. coli O157:H7 outbreak linked to I.M. Healthy brand SoyNut Butter products that sickened 32 people in 12 states. Nine people in that outbreak developed HUS, a type of kidney failure. Some people may still have some of those products in their home. All flavors and sizes of I.M. Healthy SoyNut Butters and Granolas, and other products were recalled. If you have those products in your home, throw them away immediately. Escherichia¬†coli (E. coli) bacteria are found everywhere; in the environment, in foods, and the intestines of people and some animals. While most of these bacteria are harmless, several types can cause serious illness and even death. … [Read more...]

Mystery of Two MN Children with E. coli Infections Unsolved

The Minnesota Department of Health has ended its investigation into two E. coli illnesses in Wright County. Two young children, siblings, were sickened with the deadly pathogen. One of the little ones died, and the other is recovering at home. Both children developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, a type of kidney failure, after they acquired the infections. The strain of bacteria that caused the illnesses is Shiga toxin-producing E. coli, or STEC, also known as STEC O145. Another undetermined type of STEC was also found in isolates. Investigators looked at all known potential sources of E. coli bacteria as they tried to figure out where the bacteria came from. Those sources included foods such as ground beef, leafy greens, and raw milk, along with swimming, person-to-person … [Read more...]

E. coli Outbreak After Mesa County Fair in Grand Junction, CO

At least eight people are sick with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli infections after visiting the Mesa County Fair in Grand Junction, Colorado, according to a news release by Mesa County Public Health. The fair was held from July 25 to July 29, 2017. This type of pathogenic bacteria is common in cattle, sheep, and goats, according to the press release. People can get sick when they come into contact with these animals, their bedding, fence railings, or anything in the surrounding environment. The animals shed E. coli in their feces, and it can get onto their coats or contaminate anything in the area. Public health officials have also been in contact with child care providers and health care providers to try to determine the magnitude of the outbreak and prevent further illnesses. … [Read more...]

E. coli-HUS Outbreak in Virginia in March 2016 Associated with Raw Milk

An E. coli outbreak associated with raw milk that occurred in March 2016 was announced at the Virginia Department of Health Field Epidemiology Seminar, held on June 2, 2017 in Fredericksburg, Virginia. Daniel Ferrell, MPH, District Epidemiologist for the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health district presented the information. In March 2016, a doctor notified the Virginia Department of Health of four hospitalized patients who were diagnosed with Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) infections. Two of those patients developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). All of the patients consumed raw milk from a farm in the Rappahannock-Rapidan Health District as part of a herd-share program. Officials continued to receive more report of patients with STEC infections or HUS who had also consumed raw … [Read more...]

Lake Wildwood Beach E. coli-HUS Outbreak Sickens 9 Children in CA

The E. coli outbreak that is possibly linked to Lake Wildwood Beach in California has now sickened nine young children, according to the Nevada County Public Health Department (NCPHD. The outbreak started on July 27, 2017. As of August 2, 2017, nine children are sick. Six of those children have been hospitalized; two of those patients have returned home. Three of the hospitalized children have developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a type of kidney failure. One adult closely associated with one of the sick children has also been diagnosed with an E. coli infection. Young children are most likely to develop HUS after an E. coli infection. Shiga toxins released by the bacteria can travel through the bloodstream, killing red blood cells which then travel to the kidneys and … [Read more...]

E. coli Outbreak Associated with Lake Wildwood Main Beach, CA

Five young children have been sickened after allegedly swimming at Lake Wildwood Main Beach, according to the Nevada County Public Health Department in California. Tests for three of the children are preliminarily positive for E. coli infections. Three of the children have been hospitalized. News reports state that others, including adults, may be sick as well. The Lake Wildwood Main Beach area was closed temporarily as a precaution late last week. Public health officials collected water samples near the shoreline and the swim area. The Main Beach and swimming area are closed now, because test results received on July 29, 2017 showed elevated fecal coliform, which are bacteria that cause serious illness. The Health Department is working with the Nevada County Environmental Health … [Read more...]

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