August 18, 2019

Dungeness Valley Creamery Recalls Raw Milk, Cream For Possible E. coli

Dungeness Valley Creamery of Sequim, Washington, is voluntarily recalling their raw whole milk, raw skim milk, and raw cream, because it may be contaminated with E. coli bacteria. The same facility recalled the same products in April 2019 for the same pathogen. No illnesses have been reported to the creamery or to public health officials to date in connection with this problem. The recall was initiated after routine sampling conducted by the Washington State Department of Agriculture found the toxin-producing E. coli bacteria in retail raw whole milk that is dated 06/05. Dungeness Valley Creamery is working with the Washington State Department of Agriculture to try to find the source of the pathogen. The day's raw whole milk, raw skim milk, and raw cream with best by dates of … [Read more...]

ALDI Baker’s Corner Flour Linked to E. coli O26 Outbreak

ALDI Baker's Corner flour has been linked to an E. coli O26 outbreak that has sickened at least 17 people in 8 states, according to the Centers for Diseases Control ands Prevention (CDC). That flour was recalled on May 23, 2019. The case count by state is: California (1), Connecticut (1), Missouri (1), New Jersey (1), New York (5), Pennsylvania (2), and Rhode Island (1). Illness onset dates range from December 11, 2018 to April 17, 2018. The patient age range is from 7 to 86 years. Of 17 people who have been interviewed by public health officials, 3 have been hospitalized. There is no information about whether or not any of the patients have developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a serious complication of an E. coli infection that causes kidney failure. Whole genome … [Read more...]

Georgia, Kentucky, Tennessee Hardest Hit in Ground Beef E. coli O103 Outbreak

The states that have been the hardest hit in the ground beef E. coli O103 outbreak are Georgia, Kentucky, and Tennessee. Those states combined have 173 of the 196 people sickened in this outbreak. The outbreak does seem to be slowing down, according to the epidemiological Date of Illness Onset chart. Most cases were diagnosed in mid-March 2019, and have trailed off since then. But even though two companies have recalled raw ground beef products, the outbreak continues to grow. According to the epi chart, there could be as many as 50 more cases in this outbreak before it ends. States are investigating more illnesses that may be part of this outbreak. This outbreak actually begin in Kentucky, when public health officials there noticed a spike in E. coli cases. At first, … [Read more...]

Ground Beef E. coli O103 Outbreak Grows to 196 Sick

The ground beef E. coli O103 outbreak has now sickened at least 196 people in 10 states, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Twenty-eight people have been hospitalized because they are so sick. Two people have developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). No one has died. That's an addition of 19 more ill persons since the last update on April 26, 2019. The patient case count by state is: Florida (5), Georgia (49), Illinois (1), Indiana (1), Kentucky (69), Minnesota (1), Mississippi (1), Ohio (12), Tennessee (55), and Virginia (2). The patient age range is from less than 1 year to 84 years, with a median age of 19. The hospitalization rate is 16%. The outbreak notice states that "Ill people in this outbreak ate ground beef from many sources. Some … [Read more...]

Is Ground Beef the Kentucky E. coli O103 Outbreak Culprit?

The E. coli O103 outbreak in Kentucky is rare because this pathogen doesn't cause many illnesses in the United States. But at least 46 people in Kentucky and more in four other states are sick; and officials don't know what caused this outbreak. They may have narrowed down the possibilities. Is ground beef the Kentucky E. coli O103 outbreak culprit? News outlets have stated that officials are looking at ground beef, as well as chicken and American cheese; however, no officials have confirmed this information. Testing is ongoing, and may take a few days or a few weeks to complete. Contaminated ground beef has been the cause for E. coli outbreaks for many years, including the outbreak last year that was linked to Adams Farm Slaughterhouse, and ground beef produced by PT Farm in New … [Read more...]

Twenty Sick with E. coli O103 in Kentucky

The Kentucky Department of Public Health told the press on Friday, March 29, 2019, that twenty people in that state have tested positive for E. coli O103. This relatively rare strain of E. coli bacteria causes serious symptoms, just like the more common E. coli O157:H7 pathogen. The source of the outbreak hasn't been identified, but yesterday officials said that the patients had "extensive fast food exposure." That could mean that any chain restaurant could be involved in this outbreak. Six people have been hospitalized because their illness is so critical. No official has said that anyone has developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a serious complication of a Shiga toxin-producing E. coli infection (STEC). Since many of those sickened are children, according to yesterday's … [Read more...]

New Dates For Implementing Agricultural Water Produce Safety

FDA's Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb and Deputy Commissioner Frank Yiannas have addressed advancing new tools and science for produce safety via agricultural water, and have set new dates for implementation. The two E. coli O157:H7 outbreaks that were linked to romaine lettuce in 2018 were allegedly caused by contaminated agricultural water. In early 2018, 210 people were sickened in an E. coli O157:H7 outbreak linked to romaine lettuce grown in the Yuma, Arizona region of the country. Ninety-six people were hospitalized, and 27 developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which can cause kidney failure. Five people died. This outbreak was the largest of its kind since 2006. The outbreak strain was found in canal water in the area. And in late 2018, romaine lettuce grown in … [Read more...]

How Is HUS Diagnosed After an E. coli Infection?

Hemolytic uremic syndrome, or HUS, is one of the most serious complications of any foodborne illness infection. It is caused by misshapen red blood cells that are created when Shiga toxins produced by E. coli bacteria travel through the bloodstream to the kidneys. The destroyed blood cells clog the glomeruli, which are tiny tubes in the kidneys. The kidneys can shut down, and some patients experience kidney failure. One of the worst things about this complication is that most patients are children under the age of 5, who have no choice in what they are given to eat or drink. Symptoms of HUS include little to no urine output (oligoanuria), lethargy, pale skin, a skin rash, and bleeding from the nose or mouth. If someone is experiencing these symptoms, it's critical that they … [Read more...]

How Do You Know If You Have an E. coli Infection?

If you contract an E. coli infection, the symptoms are unmistakeable. Because of the toxins the pathogen produces, and how it attacks the body, patients know they are really ill. All pathogens are assigned a "multiplier" by public health officials. The number is chosen based on how many people actually go to a doctor when they contract food poisoning. The multiplier for Salmonella infections is 38, because not many people need to see a physician when they are ill. The multiplier for E. coli infections is 2. That means that half of all E. coli infections are reported to public health officials. The main symptoms of E. coli infections are: Very severe and painful abdominal cramps Bloody and watery diarrhea Mild fever Those symptoms usually begin three to … [Read more...]

E. coli O157:H7 Romaine Lettuce Outbreak Ends With 62 Sick

The latest E. coli O157:H7 romaine lettuce outbreak has ended with 62 sick, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Those people live in 16 states and the District of Columbia. The case count by state is:┬áCalifornia (12), Connecticut (1), Washington DC (1), Florida (1), Georgia (1), Illinois (2), Louisiana (1), Massachusetts (1), Maryland (1), Michigan (7), New Hampshire (6), New Jersey (13), New York (7), Ohio (1), Pennsylvania (5), Rhode Island (1), and Wisconsin (1). Illness onset dates ranged from October 7, 2018 to December 4, 2018. Twenty-five people were hospitalized because they were so sick. Two people developed hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), a type of kidney failure. The FDA, CDC, and state partners investigated farms and cooling facilities in … [Read more...]

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